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whig

General Crossword Questions for “whig”

  • Antecedent of a Liberal politician in Britain
  • Seventeenth century politician
  • Former politician may be hot wearing toupee

Encyclopedia

  • The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. This name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of 1776, who fought for independence, and because "Whig" was then a widely recognized label of choice for people who saw. — “Whig Party (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • Both parties began as loose groupings or tendencies, but became quite formal by 1784, with the ascension of Charles James Fox as the leader of a reconstituted "Whig" party ranged against the governing party of the new "Tories" under William Pitt the Younger. — “Whig (British political party) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • Whig history presents the past as an inevitable progression towards ever greater liberty and enlightenment, culminating in modern forms of liberal In general, Whig historians stress the rise of constitutional government, personal freedoms and scientific progress. — “Whig history - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org

Quotations

  • "He can't last ten days," said a whig secretary of the treasury with a triumphant glance at Mr Taper as they met in Pall Mall; "You're out for our lives." — “Sybil” by Benjamin Disraeli
  • Why–why–why–did I not overhear you telling her she must behave like a princess? You have made a Whig of the girl; and how should her father, or anybody else, expect any obedience from her?"–"Brother," answered Mrs Western, with an air of great disdain, "I cannot express the contempt I have for your politics of all kinds; but I will appeal likewise to the young lady herself, whether I have ever taught her any principles of disobedience. — “Tom Jones” by Henry Fielding
  • Had it been otherwise–had an active politician been put into this influential post, to assume the easy task of making head against a Whig Collector, whose infirmities withheld him from the personal administration of his office–hardly a man of the old corps would have drawn the breath of official life within a month after the exterminating angel had come up the Custom-House steps. — “The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The messenger found him at table, with a number of the leaders of the Whig faction, the Marquis of Annandale being in the chair; and, the prisoner's note being produced, Wringhim read it aloud, accompanying it with some explanatory remarks. — “The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner” by James Hogg
  • But I confess, that, after I had been a little too copious in talking of my own beloved country, of our trade and wars by sea and land, of our schisms in religion, and parties in the state; the prejudices of his education prevailed so far, that he could not forbear taking me up in his right hand, and stroking me gently with the other, after a hearty fit of laughing, asked me, “whether I was a whig or tory?” Then turning to his first minister, who waited behind him with a white staff, near as tall as the mainmast of the Royal Sovereign, he observed “how contemptible a thing was human grandeur, which could be mimicked by such diminutive insects as I: and yet,” says he, “I dare engage these creatures have their titles and distinctions of honour; they contrive little nests and burrows, that they call houses and cities; they make a figure in dress and equipage; they love, they fight, they dispute, they cheat, they betray!” And thus he continued on, while my colour came and went several times, with indignation, to hear our noble country, the mistress of arts and arms, the scourge of France, the arbitress of Europe, the seat of virtue, piety, honour, and truth, the pride and envy of the world, so contemptuously treated. — “Gulliver's Travels” by Jonathan Swift
  • The nobleman who had been elevated out of his seat by the death of his father had been a great Whig magnate, whose family was possessed of immense wealth and of popularity equal to its possessions. — “The Way We Live Now” by Anthony Trollope

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