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grovelling

Encyclopedia

  • This is a custom userbox I personally created. Please do not edit this page. Thanks. Code: {{User:TheBilly/ubx/TW vs rollback}} This user makes excellent contributions with Twinkle and has no intention of grovelling for rollback. Retrieved from ". — “User:TheBilly/ubx/TW vs rollback - Wikipedia, the free”, en.wikipedia.org
  • [edit] Grovelling bastard. The sentance: "The Prince of Wales was a noted fan, and Milligan by calling him a 'little grovelling bastard' on television in 1994. — “Talk:Spike Milligan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • They must have left a begging note with a photo of themselves shown grovelling with a piece of paper with my name on it on my talk page. Must be fluent in at least three spoken languages, and one computer language. They have gotten drunk with Jimbo Wales at least once. — “User:Andypandy.UK/RfACriteria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org

Quotations

  • Don Quixote smiled when he heard these words, and said very calmly, "Come now, base, ill-born brood; call ye it highway robbery to give freedom to those in bondage, to release the captives, to succour the miserable, to raise up the fallen, to relieve the needy? Infamous beings, who by your vile grovelling intellects deserve that heaven should not make known to you the virtue that lies in knight-errantry, or show you the sin and ignorance in which ye lie when ye refuse to respect the shadow, not to say the presence, of any knight-errant! Come now; band, not of officers, but of thieves; footpads with the licence of the Holy Brotherhood; tell me who was the ignoramus who signed a warrant of arrest against such a knight as I am? Who was he that did not know that knights-errant are independent of all jurisdictions, that their law is their sword, their charter their prowess, and their edicts their will? Who, I say again, was the fool that knows not that there are no letters patent of nobility that confer such privileges or exemptions as a knight-errant acquires the day he is dubbed a knight, and devotes himself to the arduous calling of chivalry? What knight-errant ever paid poll-tax, duty, queen's pin-money, king's dues, toll or ferry? What tailor ever took payment of him for making his clothes? What castellan that received him in his castle ever made him pay his shot? What king did not seat him at his table? What damsel was not enamoured of him and did not yield herself up wholly to his will and pleasure? And, lastly, what knight-errant has there been, is there, or will there ever be in the world, not bold enough to give, single-handed, four hundred cudgellings to four hundred officers of the Holy Brotherhood if they come in his way?" — “Don Quixote” by Miguel De Cervantes
  • "They have preyed upon man's grovelling preference for his material over his spiritual interests, and have betrayed him into supplying that element of struggle and warfare without which no race can advance. — “Erewhon” by Samuel Butler
  • The king was struck with horror at the description I had given of those terrible engines, and the proposal I had made. “He was amazed, how so impotent and grovelling an insect as I” (these were his expressions) “could entertain such inhuman ideas, and in so familiar a manner, as to appear wholly unmoved at all the scenes of blood and desolation which I had painted as the common effects of those destructive machines; whereof,” he said, “some evil genius, enemy to mankind, must have been the first contriver. — “Gulliver's Travels” by Jonathan Swift
  • Sentiments the reverse of all those whose influence my former life had attested, denoting a mind polluted by grovelling vices, and entering into compact with that of a thief and a murderer. — “Wieland” by Charles Brockden Brown
  • He was grovelling in abject terror before Sotillo, but he remembered that much. — “Nostromo” by Joseph Conrad
  • And when this abbot had this wonder seen, His salte teares trickled down as rain: And groff* he fell all flat upon the ground, *prostrate, grovelling And still he lay, as he had been y-bound. — “Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer

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