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fretting

Encyclopedia

  • For fretting in music, see fret. Fretting refers to wear and sometimes corrosion damage at the asperities of contact surfaces. The ASM Handbook on Fatigue and Fracture defines fretting as: "A special wear process that occurs at the contact area between two materials under load and subject to. — “Fretting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • A fingerboard may be fretted, having raised strips of hard material perpendicular to the strings against which the strings are stopped. The frets are sufficiently high that pressing strings against the fingerboard is unnecessary for the frets to stop their vibrations so that the. — “Fingerboard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • For other uses, see Fret (disambiguation). The neck of a guitar showing the nut (in the background, coloured white) and first four metal frets. A fret is a raised portion on the neck of a stringed instrument, that extends generally across the full width of the neck. — “Fret - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org

Quotations

  • Such an one I have known who, having been very imperious in his youth, when he came to be old, though he might have lived at his full ease, would ever strike, rant, swear, and curse: the most violent householder in France: fretting himself with unnecessary suspicion and vigilance. — “Essays” by Michel de Montaigne
  • Georgiana, when not unburdening her heart to me, spent most of her time in lying on the sofa, fretting about the dulness of the house, and wishing over and over again that her aunt Gibson would send her an invitation up to town. "It would be so much better," she said, "if she could only get out of the way for a month or two, till all was over." I did not ask what she meant by "all being over," but I suppose she referred to the expected decease of her mother and the gloomy sequel of funeral rites. — “Jane Eyre” by Charlotte Bronte
  • And yet againward shrieked ev'ry nun, The pang of love so strained them to cry: "Now woe the time," quoth they, "that we be boun'!* *bound This hateful order nice* will do us die! *into which we foolishly We sigh and sob, and bleeden inwardly, entered Fretting ourselves with thought and hard complaint, That nigh for love we waxe wood* and faint." *mad... — “Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer
  • But from that night until the end came, there was but one thing happened to tell save a series of innumerable small unpleasant details and the fretting of an incessant uneasiness. — “The Island of Dr Moreau” by HG Wells
  • Not for the first time a sense of the ludicrous came to my assistance, as I saw myself fretting in London under my burden of self-imposed woes, nicely weighing that insidious invitation, and stepping finally into the snare with the dignity due to my importance; kidnapped as neatly as ever a peaceful clerk was kidnapped by a lawless press-gang, and, in the end, finding as the arch-conspirator a guileless and warm-hearted friend, who called me clever, lodged me in a cell, and blandly invited me to talk German to the purpose, as he was aiming at a little secret service on the high seas. — “The Riddle of the Sands” by Erskine Childers
  • I hear the Egyptian harp of many strings, The primitive chants of the Nile boatmen, The sacred imperial hymns of China, To the delicate sounds of the king, (the stricken wood and stone,) Or to Hindu flutes and the fretting twang of the vina, A band of bayaderes. — “Leaves of grass” by Walt Whitman

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