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bestirring

Encyclopedia

  • The Nagarakretagama or Nagarakrtagama or also known as Desawarnana is an Old Javanese eulogy to Hayam Wuruk, the ruler of the Majapahit Kingdom. gold and silver, all of them bestirring themselves the more in their respective customary. — “Nagarakretagama - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • It refers basically to the unemployed in capitalist society. by starvation as calmly as other natural event without bestirring himself, and, on the other hand, to regard the misery. — “Reserve army of labour - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org
  • During the journey, his page is about to give up the struggle against the cold weather, Now bestirring, green and strong, find in growth their pleasure; All the world with. — “Good King Wenceslas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”, en.wikipedia.org

Quotations

  • As the rooks, at dawn of day Bestirring them to dry their feathers chill, Some speed their way a-field, and homeward some, Returning, cross their flight, while some abide And wheel around their airy lodge; so seem'd That glitterance, wafted on alternate wing, As upon certain stair it met, and clash'd Its shining. — “The Divine Comedy” by Dante Alighieri
  • Until Cabaco's published discovery, the sailors had little foreseen it, though to be sure when, after being a little while out of port, all hands had concluded the customary business of fitting the whaleboats for service; when some time after this Ahab was now and then found bestirring himself in the matter of making thole-pins with his own hands for what was thought to be one of the spare boats, and even solicitously cutting the small wooden skewers, which when the line is running out are pinned over the groove in the bow: when all this was observed in him, and particularly his solicitude in having an extra coat of sheathing in the bottom of the boat, as if to make it better withstand the pointed pressure of his ivory limb; and also the anxiety he evinced in exactly shaping the thigh board, or clumsy cleat, as it is sometimes called, the horizontal piece in the boat's bow for bracing the knee against in darting or stabbing at the whale; when it was observed how often he stood up in that boat with his solitary knee fixed in the semi-circular depression in the cleat, and with the carpenter's chisel gouged out a little here and straightened it a little there; all these things, I say, had awakened much interest and curiosity at the time. — “Moby-Dick” by Herman Melville
  • I tipped him several more, and he was in great spirits. We left him bestirring himself to feed the fowls, and we sat down to our punch in the arbor; where Wemmick told me, as he smoked a pipe, that it had taken him a good many years to bring the property up to its present pitch of perfection. — “Great expectations” by Charles Dickens
  • The period of reflection succeeding this silly action compelled me to admit the necessity of smothering my pride and choking my wrath, and bestirring myself to remove its effects. — “Wuthering Heights” by Emily Bronte

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